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Mobile Etiquette Unacceptable

October 14th, 2013 by Geoff Baldwin

For many businesspeople their need to be constantly monitoring and reacting to their mobile phone has got to the point where they are totally oblivious they’re being judged as ignorant and uncaring by those around them according to RE/MAX WA Managing Director, Geoff Baldwin.

“Accepting calls whilst in a conversation, constantly stepping out of training sessions to take or return calls, texting during sessions, being fixated to their mobile screen when talking to people are all becoming unfortunate traits that we are being judged by”, Mr Baldwin said.

“There is no argument that a mobile phone is an important tool however it should not be something that rules our lives and it should certainly never interfere or override current conversations or interactions.

“I know that that may sound like a radical approach but it is my view that answering a mobile phone call is often the most disrespectful thing we can do, not only to other people around us but also to the caller.

“It is more often the case we are concentrating on something else when our phones ring so the chances of us being able to respond positively and fully to the caller’s inquiry are minimal.

“By letting all of our calls go to voicemail we remain focussed on the task at hand and maintain more genuine, uninterrupted conversations but importantly, the caller will have left their name, their contact details and exactly what they are inquiring about so that when you return their call you can be clear minded and prepared.

“Obviously we should return calls in a timely manner and it is very common for people to express their appreciation by saying “thanks for getting back to me” however, it is interesting that almost no one ever thanks you for answering your phone.

“Leaving a mobile on vibrate, or even silent mode, on the table in front of you at appointments or in training sessions is just as annoying in that you and others around you are distracted every time your phone screen lights up and you glance at it or pick it up not to mention tweeting and other social media habits.

“I encourage people I work with to leave their phone in the car whenever they are going into a meeting or at least, turn it off completely and return calls after their appointment or during breaks.

“I also point out that there is no reason to raise our voices 10 or 20 decibels louder when we are talking on our mobile phones which is another distracting and disrespectful habit of many agents.

“A mobile phone is a wonderful resource but when it starts to control the lives of agents and disrupt the lives of those around them then it is time to take stock and be more aware of our actions”, Mr Baldwin said.